•  
  •  
 

Abstract

The power plate (PP) is designed to reduce training time while providing a muscle stimulus that leads to positive changes in muscle mass. This study investigated the effect that training on the PP has compared to a free-weight (FW) program, on upper body endurance, defined as the number of push-ups completed at one time prior to failure. Following IRB approval a pre-test was used to assess push-up endurance in PP and FW cohorts. Each group exercised for six consecutive weeks, working out three times per week, on non-consecutive days performing five exercises of two sets of 8-12 repetitions. Twenty-two females and 2 males enrolled in the investigation. Eleven with a mean age of 22 years (20-24) participated in the PP cohort. Thirteen participated in the FW arm of the study with a mean age of 24.5 (20-29) years. Shapiro-Wilk found lack of data normality. Wilcoxon Rank Sum testing yielded statistically significant differences within groups. The FW comparison between pre and post test showed a p value of 0.016. The PP group pre to post test p value was 0.005. Nonparametric testing (Mann Whitney) found no statistical differences (p=0.62) between Group A (FW) and Group B (PP) on the push-up pre-test. The post-test comparing post testing differences between groups (PP and FW) found no statistical differences (p=0.55) in the push-up test. Subjects in both groups saw increases in upper-body endurance with statistically significant differences within groups. Based on our findings the PP is a useful tool which enhances upper body muscle endurance.