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Abstract

Matthew J. Andre, Andrew C. Fry, Patricia R. Dietz, Glenn J. Cain, Andrea Hudy; University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

Studies have found inverse relationships between salivary cortisol and vertical jump, standing broad jump, and peak force and rate of force development (isometric mid-thigh pull) in athletes. However, to our knowledge, no study has determined the relationship between salivary cortisol and power and velocity during barbell speed squats. PURPOSE: Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between salivary cortisol and power and velocity during barbell speed squats in elite collegiate basketball players. METHODS: Ten NCAA Division I male basketball players (x±SD; height = 2.00±0.09 m; weight = 95.9±9.5 kg) gave saliva samples immediately prior to 2 regularly-scheduled afternoon workouts, one week apart, at the beginning of the competitive season. Each workout included 1 set of 3 repetitions in the barbell back squat exercise at 50% 1 RM. All repetitions were performed as explosively as possible. A 3-dimensional video motion capture system was used to measure mean velocity and mean power for each repetition. Pearson correlations were used to determine relationships between cortisol and mean velocity and mean power for the repetition with the highest mean velocity and mean power (α = .05). RESULTS: Mean velocity was 0.85±.08 m˙s-1 and mean power was 565.1±86.2 W. There were no statistically-significant correlations between cortisol and any of the performance measures (see Table 1).

CONCLUSION: In this population, the relationship between salivary cortisol and power and velocity during barbell speed squats was not statistically significant. Other studies have found statistically-significant inverse relationships between salivary cortisol and other measures of anaerobic speed and power in athletes. It is possible that the load was inappropriate for this population or that the other basketball-related daily activities may have affected the relationship. Future studies should attempt a battery of tests with the same population, both in and out of season, to determine what variables are most related to salivary cortisol.

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