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Article Title

NO EFFECT OF CARBOHYDRATE MOUTH RINSING ON CYCLING TIME-TRIAL PERFORMANCE IN THE FED OR FASTED STATE

Authors

BS Snyder
MD Haub

Abstract

Brian S. Snyder1 & Mark D. Haub2 1Truman State University, Kirksville, MO 2Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

It has been reported that carbohydrate mouth rinsing during short (~1-hr) high intensity cycling events can have an ergogenic effect. However, the nutritional status of the participant prior to the exercise bout may influence the capacity of carbohydrate mouth rinse to produce an ergogenic effect. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of carbohydrate mouth rinsing on cycling performance during a 1-hr time trial in the fasted or fed state. METHODS: Twelve endurance-trained athletes (male n=10, female n=2) participated in 4 performance trails using a double-blinded Latin square design. After a wattmax test and familiarization protocol two of the trials were conducted after a 10-hr fast and two of the trials were conducted 2-hrs after a standard breakfast. Participants rinsed their mouth immediately before and every 7.5 minutes of the performance test with either a 6.4% maltodextrin-lemon juice solution (C) or 0% maltodextrin-lemon juice solution (P) and then expectorated. RESULTS: There was no significant difference (p > 0.5) between treatments in distance covered (27.5 ± 3.1 km [FastC], 27.8 ± 3.0 km [FedC], 28.1 ± 2.5 km [FedP], and 27.4 ± 3.2 km [FastP]), average watts, heart rate, or rating of perceived exertion. CONCLUSION: We conclude that carbohydrate mouth rinsing was not ergogenic in the fasted or fed state in endurance-trained cyclists.

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