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Article Title

THE EFFECTS OF ULTRA MARATHON TRAIL RUNNING ON SALIVARY BIOMARKERS

Abstract

Catherine A. Hambleton, Jake A. Deckert, Philip M. Gallagher. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; e-mail: c890h962@ku.edu

Numerous people are affected by performance challenges brought on by race induced psychological and physiological stress. Understanding how 50 Kilometer ultra-marathon trail running (UMT) alters endocrine and inflammatory biomarkers is currently unknown. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in salivary α- amylase, cortisol, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concentrations following participation in UMT. METHODS: Eighteen ultra-marathon racers (25-52 yr, average longest run 73.2 Km) participated in this study. Two-minute oral swabs were taken 10min prior to race start and again within 1min of race finish. Samples were analyzed using ELISA kits. RESULTS: Twelve racers completed the event (average finish time 6:57:26). Salivary cortisol increased by (73%) and α-amylase by (148%), both exhibited significantly increased concentrations at the end of the event relative to baseline values. No significant differences were observed for IL-1β. CONCLUSION: Participation in UMT is associated with activation of the sympathoadrenal and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axes. IL-1β, an inflammatory maker, does not appear to increase but could be a result of the collection timing. Future research should investigate the time course for inflammatory markers following UMT. Understanding stress and improved interpretation of biomarkers could lead to improvements in training and performance of participants involved in UMT as well as occupational specialties within the military that commonly undertake physical tasks of this nature.

Funding provided by Soy Health Research Program (SHRP) award

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