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Abstract

Following menopause, fat redistribution and increased risk for dyslipidemia are common. The influence of menopause; however, on the associations between total and regional fat mass with lipids and lipoproteins remains unclear. PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of menopausal status on associations between total and regional fat mass and lipids and lipoproteins. METHODS: Sedentary, non-smoking women (n=209) were grouped based on current menstrual status: premenopausal (n=143, mean±SD; age=42.7±7.7 yr, BMI=24.5±4.0 kg•m -2, WC=77.4±9.9 cm) or postmenopausal (n=66, mean±SD; age=52.9±5.3 yr, BMI= 24.9±4.2 kg•m -2, WC=78.8±9.9 cm). Fasting (12 hr) serum samples were analyzed for total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (Tg), LDL-C, HDL-C, HDL2-C, and HDL3-C concentrations. Total (TF), abdominal (AF), hip (HF) and mid-thigh (MTF) fat mass were quantified by DXA. A MANCOVA was used to determine differences between groups for total and regional fat mass and lipids and lipoproteins controlling for HRT status. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to determine if menopausal status influenced the association of total and regional fat mass with lipids and lipoproteins. The criterion reference for statistical significance was set at a P < 0.05. RESULTS: Postmenopausal women had significantly greater TC, HDL-C, LDL-C and HDL3-C concentrations than premenopausal women. No significant differences were observed between groups for total and regional fat mass. In premenopausal women, AF predicted TC, but no associations were observed in postmenopausal women. In premenopausal women, AF+HF and AF+TF were significant predictors of Tg and LDL-C, respectively. In contrast, only AF predicted Tg and LDL-C in postmenopausal women. AF+MTF best predicted HDL-C in premenopausal women; however, TF+MTF best predicted HDL-C in postmenopausal women. In premenopausal women, no associations were observed with HDL2-C or HDL3-C. TF and TF+MTF were best predictors of HDL2-C and HDL3-C, respectively in postmenopausal women. CONCLUSION: Menopausal status has an effect on lipid and lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations, but not on total and regional fat mass. In addition, menopausal status had an influence on the associations of total and regional fat mass with lipids and lipoproteins.

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