•  
  •  
 

Abstract

Exercise-associated hyponatremia (serum sodium < 135 mmol/L) is a rare, but serious condition that has been identified in those engaging in prolonged, physical activity conducted in the heat. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydration status and glycogen level on plasma IL-6, ADH, and sodium concentrations during and after prolonged exercise in the heat. METHODS: Ten male participants completed four trials: a glycogen depleted, euhydrated condition (DE); a glycogen depleted, dehydrated condition (DD); a glycogen loaded, euhydrated condition (LE); and a glycogen loaded, dehydrated condition (LD) consisting of cycling 90 minutes at 60% VO2 max in a 35˚C environment followed by a 3-h rehydration (RH) period. During RH, subjects received either 150% of fluid lost (DD & LD) or an additional 50% of fluid lost (DE & LE). Exercise and RH blood samples were analyzed for glucose, IL-6, ADH, and Na+. Sweat and urine samples were analyzed for [Na+]. RESULTS: Post-exercise to post-rehydration [Na+] changes for LD, DD, DE and LE were -6.85, -6.7, -1.45 and 0.10 mM, respectively. Post-exercise [IL-6] for DD, LD, DE, and LE were 5.4, 4.0, 3.7, and 3.49 pg/mL, respectively. Post-exercise [ADH] for LD, DD, DE, and LE were 21.5, 12.8, 7.6, and 1.9 pg/mL, respectively. The number of hyponatremic measurements for all RH samples was 5, 5, 20, and 10 for LD, DD, DE, and LE, respectively. CONCLUSION: Despite our glycogen and hydration manipulations, no regulatory effects of IL-6 and ADH on plasma sodium were observed. The timing of fluid intake did alter plasma sodium since euhydration during exercise combined with an additional 50% intake during RH, and a post-exercise RH volume of 150% of fluid lost both resulted in sodium concentrations below initial levels. Supported by a grant from the Gatorade Sports Science Institute.

Share

COinS
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.