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Article Title

ACTIVE RECOVERY DURING HIIT INDUCES HIGHER HR BUT LOWER PERCEIVED EXERTION THAN PASSIVE RECOVERY

Abstract

K.D.A. Davey, C.J. Pastorino, E.L. Kass, C.W. Carroll, & M.M. Lockard

Willamette University, Salem, OR

High intensity interval training (HIIT) has become a common protocol for athletic conditioning. An important aspect of recovery during the rest interval of HIIT is believed to be lactate clearance; however it is not clear whether active or passive recovery clears lactate more efficiently. Purpose: to determine if HIIT paired with active recovery will clear lactate more readily than passive recovery. Methods: 12 collegiate football players at Willamette University underwent two, 1:3 work-to-rest ratio HIIT bouts on the cycle ergometer (10s sprint, 30s recovery), using either active or passive rest. Subjects completed 12 intervals. Heart rate, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), and lactate were recorded every four intervals as well as after a two-minute post-test recovery period. Workrate was recorded during each interval to calculate fatigue index. Results: The active recovery protocol resulted in higher heart rate and lower RPE (p.05). Discussion: Increased HR indicates increased blood flow to working tissue, while lower RPE indicates less fatigue in the active protocol. Thus, active recovery protocols allow for increased training volume. Conclusion: Lactate clearance is similar between recovery protocols, but active recovery induces increased HR and lower RPE suggesting that athletes may benefit from active recovery during HIIT.

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