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Article Title

DETERMINATION OF METABOLIC PATHWAY IN RESPONSE TO CYCLING VERSUS VINYASA YOGA

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this experiment is to determine whether there is a difference in metabolic response to Cycling & Vinyasa Yoga. METHODS: Six male and six female participants aged 19-35 participated in two exercise sessions spaced 1 week apart. The participants fasted 12 hours prior to a one hour Vinyasa yoga session, and again prior to a 1-hour session of stationary cycling the following week. Heart rate was collected at predetermined time points during the Vinyasa yoga session. In order to normalize the level of intensity in both exercise bouts, participants pedaled at a pace that matched their individual heart rate during the yoga session. Urine samples were collected from participants before and immediately after the yoga and cycling exercise bouts. Urine samples were frozen at -80 Fahrenheit, and later analyzed using a Bruker 600 1H-NMR running TopSpin 2.0 software. We were able to determine the identity of 13 metabolites with certainty. These metabolites are as follows: phelylalanine, creatinine, creatine, creatine/creatinine, glycine, choline, taurine, dimethylamine, citrate, pyruvate, alanine, lactate, and beta hydroxybutyrate. The data was analyzed using a combination of analytical techniques, including paired t-test, a bucketing strategy, and MetaboAnalyst 2.0. RESULTS: We found no significant difference in the metabolites excreted in the urine between different exercise regimens. CONCLUSION: Exercise intensity and/or lack of adequate sampling may have influenced the lack of significant differences with regard to urine metabolite levels in this study. Although our study did not find any significant change in metabolites, the application of this methodological approach has merit. For example, this methodology could be used to study changes in metabolic pathways in many different environments that include logistical and/or cultural considerations, where urine samples could be collected and then transported for analysis via 1H-NMR.

Self-supported by Colin Campbell.

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