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Abstract

Nelson, C., Paulson, S. Shippensburg University, Shippensburg, PA

Purpose: This study examined the effects of prophylactic ankle taping (PAT) and bracing (PAB) on lower extremity kinematics during vertical jump (VJ) performance. Methods: Eighteen volunteers (M±SD = age: 21.4±0.9, height 170.9±10.0 cm, mass 73.2±14.5 kg, body fat 17.3±6.7%) completed the VJ under three conditions: standard PAT, lace-up PAB, and no treatment (CON). Each testing session was separated by a min of 24 hrs in a randomized and counter-balanced order. Prior to testing, the prophylactic ankle condition was applied and six reflective markers were placed along the right side of the body. The subject completed a 5-min warm-up on a Monark 824E cycle ergometer (0.5 kp) in a range of 50-60 rev/min and then performed three VJ. Each VJ was filmed (60 Hz) from the sagittal plane and a Vertec was used to measure jump height. A one-way repeated-measure ANOVA was used to analyze the variables. A paired t-test was used to assess for statistically significant differences (p < .05). Results: The ANOVA yielded statistically significant difference in VJ height (M: PAT = 49.7 cm; PAB = 49.6 cm; CON = 52.2 cm; p = .02). The average VJ height was higher during the CON by 4.85% and 4.22% as compared to the PAT and PAB, respectively. There was also a statistically significant difference in the ankle angle at takeoff (p = .04) as well as ankle (AROM; p < .01) and knee range of motion (KROM; p < .01). During the PAB, the ankle was more dorsiflexed then the CON. AROM was greatest in the CON and least in the PAB. KROM was greater during CON as compared to the PAT and PAB conditions. Conclusion: This study suggests that both PAT and PAB decreased AROM and KROM; which may have resulted in a lower VJ height. In addition, the PAB placed the ankle in a more dorsiflexed position as compared to the CON.

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