Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

Department

Political Science

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Many scholars have argued, over the next two decades China will rise while the United States begins a relative decline. Today’s youth will eventually become the next generation of leaders and policymakers. Thus, understanding youth’s perceptions of these trends can help provide insight into how they will shape the future Sino-U.S. relationship and their state’s standing in the world. This research found that the youth in China were optimistic toward their country’s prospects in the international community compared to their American counterparts. The relative optimism among the Chinese has made them more willing to participate in global affairs and institutions compared to American youth. Increased media exposure regarding the Sino-U.S. relationship correlated with greater negative perceptions of their counterpart’s country between both the Americans and Chinese. However, Americans and Chinese youth that had learned more than one language had greater positive perceptions and willingness to cooperate with their counterpart’s country.

Advisor(s) or Committee Chair

Dr. Soleiman Kiasatpour

Disciplines

Comparative Politics | Other Languages, Societies, and Cultures | Political Science

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