Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Self-Efficacy (SE) has long been established as an important predictor of performance in many settings, including academics and athletics. In both of our studies, we were examined the relationship between performance and SE to determine which was more predictive of the other. Participants completed two academic tasks, two athletic tasks, and a SE measure. In the first study participants defined success for efficacy estimates. In the second experiment three different types of goals were utilized to define success as an additional independent variable. In both experiments we found a significant relationship between SE and performance, but past performance was a stronger predictor of SE. In our second study, we found the strongest relationship between SE and performance in the moderately difficult goal condition.

Advisor(s) or Committee Chair

Dr. Steven Wininger

Disciplines

Psychology

Included in

Psychology Commons

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