Exhibits of Kentucky source materials found in WKU Library Special Collections, WKU Archives and the Kentucky Museum.

Bowling Green: Theater
Bowling Green: Theater

Bowling Green has a long history in the world of theatre. It was common and very possible to renovate empty buildings into an area for theatrics and accommodate performers and an audience. These buildings held events for numerous entertainment types, such as spectacles, dancing, recitation, pantomime, and combination animal-dramatic performances, as well as true drama. There were also melodramas, farces, and comic operas.Traveling theatrical companies and amateur groups performed regularly in Bowling Green. Bowling Green's first building for theatrical productions was Odeon Hall. The original three-story building was erected in 1866 by John Cox Underwood, according to "Our Heritage: An Album of Early Bowling Green Kentucky Landmarks" by Irene Moss Sumpter. The first performance there was a piano recital in 1869. After it was purchased in 1887 by Pleasant J. Potter it became The Potter Opera House. The building was later renovated for business. The Phoenix Theatre is the home to local troupe Public Theatre of Kentucky and also the site of Fountain Square Players' performances. The Phoenix is a great place for recitals, birthday parties, receptions, meetings, and other special events. The Princess Theatre was owned by the Crescent Amusement Co. and opened in July 1916, according to information provided by Miranda R. Clements, Greenways coordinator of the City-County Planning Commission. It may have been one of the first theaters built in Kentucky for the express purpose of showing motion pictures. After operating for more than 40 years as a theater, the Princess at 430 E. Main St. closed in 1957 and was remodeled in 1959 for retail use. Several retail operations occupied the building until 1980. The theater, which is now known as the Princess Building, once again houses several businesses. The Capitol Arts Center was built in the late 1890s as a vaudeville house and originally named the Columbia Theatre. It was renamed and converted into a movie theatre in the mid-1930s. The theatre closed in 1967. After sitting for ten years, an extensive renovation was completed, and it reopened as the Capitol Arts Center in 1981.

Spirits of Prohibition
Spirits of Prohibition

The temperance movement in the United States dates back to 1784. At the turn of the 20th century it gained enough momentum to result in the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution being ratified January 16, 1919.Public Law 66-66 aka the Volstead Act which gave the 18th amendment teeth, went into effect on October 28, 1919 and Prohibition began officially on January 17, 1920.An Act To prohibit intoxicating beverages, and to regulate the manufacture, production, use and sale of high-proof spirits for other than beverage purposes, and to insure an ample supply of alcohol and promote its use in scientific research and in the development of fuel, dye, and other lawful industries.Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the short title of this Act shall be the “National Prohibition Act.”Title I. - To Provide for the Enforcement of War Prohibition.The term “War Prohibition Act” used in this Act shall mean the provisions of any Act or Acts prohibiting the sale and manufacture of intoxicating liquors until the conclusion of the present war and thereafter until the termination of demobilization, the date of which shall be determined and proclaimed by the President of the United States. The words “beer, wine, or other intoxicating malt or vinous liquors” in the War Prohibition Act shall be hereafter construed to mean any such beverages which contain one-half of 1 per centum or more of alcohol by volume: Provided, That the foregoing definition shall not extend to dealcoholized wine nor to any beverage or liquid produced by the process by which beer, ale, porter or wine is produced, if it contains less than one-half of 1 per centum of alcohol by volume, and is made as prescribed in section 37 of Title II of this Act, and is otherwise denominated than as beer, ale, or porter, and is contained and sold in, or from, such sealed and labeled bottles, casks, or containers as the commissioner may by regulation prescribed.Prohibition damaged the wine, beer and liquor economies of several states. It led to bootlegging and speakeasies. Franklin Roosevelt ran on a platform which included the repeal of the 18th Amendment. The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment, officially ending Prohibition on December 5, 1933.Since then, Kentucky has become the world’s supplier of Bourbon. It is the country’s only native spirit and is made of 51% corn, aged in charred new oak barrels, stored at no more than 125 proof and bottled no less than 80 proof. In 2018 the Bourbon industry generated $8.6 billion, employing over 20,000 people with a payroll of $1 billion.Items in exhibit come from the Kentucky Museum, Library Special Collections and WKU Archives.