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Rapid Research Defense

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are pulmonary conditions that influence airway diameter, and these conditions may be impacted by external and internal (respiratory tract) environments. PURPOSE: The goals of this study were to a) investigate the prevalence of EIB in Division II collegiate athletes participating in a selection of sports, and b) determine how a Kinesiology department might aid in the testing. METHODS: Participants with a recent upper respiratory tract infection, or history of tobacco use or asthma, were removed. At baseline, maximal forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) values were measured (seated position). Those who failed to attain 70% of their predicted FEV1 value were removed. Baseline FEV1 readings were followed by a single bout of treadmill exercise. The protocol used involved an increase in intensity in a stepped fashion until participants reached 80-90% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate. Intensity was confirmed with ventilation (between 35* FEV1*0.5- 35*FEV1*0.6). Participants maintained this intensity for four minutes. Immediately post-exercise, participants completed an FEV1 assessment. They engaged in additional FEV1 assessments at 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20-minute time points. A fall in FEV1>10% from baseline was considered positive for EIB. RESULTS: Ninety athletes volunteered for testing with nine being removed based on exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 81, 16 tested positive for EIB (19.7%). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of pulmonary conditions in athletes may be masked by a lack of testing. It may be beneficial to test for these conditions, and a kinesiology department may be considered for assistance.

KEYWORDS: Spirometry, pulmonary conditions, forced expiratory volume, asthma

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An abstract limit of 250 words was mentioned in another location. I tried to comply with that requirement not being sure a 500 word abstract would be acceptable.

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EIB In Collegiate Athletes and How a Kinesiology Program Helped

ABSTRACT

Asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are pulmonary conditions that influence airway diameter, and these conditions may be impacted by external and internal (respiratory tract) environments. PURPOSE: The goals of this study were to a) investigate the prevalence of EIB in Division II collegiate athletes participating in a selection of sports, and b) determine how a Kinesiology department might aid in the testing. METHODS: Participants with a recent upper respiratory tract infection, or history of tobacco use or asthma, were removed. At baseline, maximal forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) values were measured (seated position). Those who failed to attain 70% of their predicted FEV1 value were removed. Baseline FEV1 readings were followed by a single bout of treadmill exercise. The protocol used involved an increase in intensity in a stepped fashion until participants reached 80-90% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate. Intensity was confirmed with ventilation (between 35* FEV1*0.5- 35*FEV1*0.6). Participants maintained this intensity for four minutes. Immediately post-exercise, participants completed an FEV1 assessment. They engaged in additional FEV1 assessments at 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20-minute time points. A fall in FEV1>10% from baseline was considered positive for EIB. RESULTS: Ninety athletes volunteered for testing with nine being removed based on exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 81, 16 tested positive for EIB (19.7%). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of pulmonary conditions in athletes may be masked by a lack of testing. It may be beneficial to test for these conditions, and a kinesiology department may be considered for assistance.

KEYWORDS: Spirometry, pulmonary conditions, forced expiratory volume, asthma

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