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Abstract

International Journal of Exercise Science 10(7): 1085-1093, 2017. The purpose of this study was to determine if heat exposure alters the measures of total body water (TBW), extracellular water (ECW), and intracellular water (ICW) in both single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS). Additionally, we sought to determine if any differences exist between the BIA and BIS techniques before and after brief exposure to heat. Body water was evaluated for twenty men (age=24±4 years) in a thermoneutral environment (22°C) before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) 15 min of passive heating (35°C) in an environmental chamber. The mean difference and 95% limits of agreement at PRE demonstrated that BIS yielded significantly higher body water values than BIA (all p<0.05; TBW=1.8kg; ECW=0.6±1.3kg; ICW=1.2±3.7kg). However, the effect size (ES) of the mean differences at PRE were small and the r-values were high (r≥0.97). TBW and ICW remained significantly higher at POST for BIS (both p<0.05; 1.4±3.2kg and 1.1±3.7kg, respectively) whereas ECW was not different (p>0.05; 0.2±1.5kg). Additionally, the ES of the mean differences at POST were trivial to small and the r-values were high (r≥0.96). When analyzing the changes in body water before and after heat exposure, POST values for BIS were significantly higher than PRE (all p<0.001; TBW=0.6±0.8kg; ECW=0.4±0.3kg; ICW=0.3±0.6kg). Similarly, POST values for BIA were significantly higher than PRE (all p<0.001; TBW=1.0±0.6kg; ECW=0.7±0.4kg; ICW=0.4±0.4kg). BIA and BIS provide similar body water estimates. However, the increase in POST body water values indicate more research is needed before either method can be used for estimating body water after heat exposure.

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