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Article Title

NCAA TRACK & CROSS COUNTRY COACHES: A PROFILE OF EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND, PAST ATHLETIC EXPERIENCE, AND JOB SATISFACTION SURVEY

Abstract

Joe Linder*1 and Danielle Hemingsonǂ1, 1Baker University, Baldwin City, KS

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between NCAA track and cross-country coaches’ educational background, athletic experience, and differences among Divisions I, II, and III. METHODS: A survey was sent via Google Docs to 519 track and/or cross-country coaches in the NCAA. Fifteen conferences in each division were chosen randomly as the sample population. Out of 519 surveys sent 112 participants responded resulting in a 21.6% response rate. RESULTS: A chi-squared test (X2 = 0.408, p=0.8153) showed no significant relationship between division and field of study. An ANOVA test (F=1.289, p= 0.259) showed no significant relationship between division and job satisfaction. A chi-squared test (X =5.6441, p=0.1303) showed no significant relationship between divisions and past athletic experience. Utilizing odds ratios predicted those who coach in Division I are 2.22 times more likely to have a degree in the field of education than in exercise science or a related field. Moreover, coaches who received an All-Conference competition status as athletes were 2.86 times more likely to be coaching in Division I than a coach who reached the All-American status as an athlete, and 1.86 times more likely than those who achieved Professional status as an athlete. CONCLUSION: No significance was found between divisions and field of study, divisions and job satisfaction, or divisions and past athletic experience. However, it is predicted those who coach Division I are more likely to have a degree in the field of education or have achieved All-Conference competition status as an athlete.

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