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Article Title

ACUTE NEUROMUSCULAR PERFORMANCE FOLLOWING HIGH AND LOW EXTERNAL TRAINING LOADS IN COLLEGIATE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL PLAYERS

Abstract

Aaron D. Heishman1,2, Ryan M. Miller1, Eduardo D.S. Freitas1, Brady S. Brown1,2, Keldon M. Peak1,2, Michael G. Bemben, FACSM1 1Neuromuscular Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma; 2Basketball Strength and Performance, Department of Athletics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma

Inertial measurement units are often utilized to quantify external training loads (eTL) experienced during indoor team sport activities, while the countermovement jump (CMJ) is employed to evaluate acute neuromuscular fatigue and performance. Limited data exists outlining the dose-response relationship of eTL and subsequent changes in CMJ performance, especially in basketball players. PURPOSE: Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute neuromuscular responses to high versus low eTL in a cohort of women’s collegiate basketball players during the off-season training phase. METHODS: Seven NCAA Division 1 women’s basketball players participated in a High and a Low eTL team practice based upon PlayerLoad/minute (PL/min). Prior to the start of each practice, three CMJs were performed on a force platform. At the conclusion of each team practice, participants performed 3 more CMJs. A dependent t-test was utilized to determine differences between practice intensities. A 2-way (condition x time) repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to examined differences in Concentric Peak Force (ConcPF), Concentric Mean Force (ConcMF), Concentric Peak Power (ConcPP), Concentric Peak Velocity (ConcPV), Eccentric Mean Deceleration Force(EccMDF), Eccentric Mean Force (EccMF), Flight Time to Contraction Time Ratio (FT:CT), and Jump Height (JH) captured during the CMJs between conditions and across time, with significance set at p ≤ 0.05. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in practice intensities (High: PL/min = 5.2 ±1.1, Low: PL/min = 6.5 ± 0.9; p = 0.001). There was a significant condition effect for ConcPV (Low = 2.48 ±0.15, High = 2.44 ± 0.05, p = 0.014). There were no other significant condition main effects and no significant time main effects (p >0.05), nor condition by time interactions for any of the CMJ neuromuscular performance variables. CONCLUSION: Although there was a significant difference between practice intensities, it appears these differences did not influence changes in CMJ performance.

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