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Article Title

SERUM MYOSTATIN AND IGF-1 AS PREDICTORS OF APPENDICULAR SKELETAL MUSCLE MASS: A PRELMINARY STUDY

Abstract

Ashley Binns1, Michelle Gray1, Wallison Domingues1, Kendyll Campbell1, Jonathan Widner1 1Exercise Science Research Center; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas

The older adult population and healthcare related costs are growing exponentially. Nearly $20 billion is annually expensed by older adults for health-related issues affiliated with age-related decline in skeletal muscle mass. Yet, diagnostic criteria to predict muscle loss are not readily utilized in clinical practice. PURPOSE: Therefore, the purpose of this study was to provide evidence for use of blood biomarkers (myostatin, IGF-1) to predict appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) among middle-aged and older adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 106 individuals (n= 68 females; n= 38 males) aged ≥40 years of age (60.1 ± 11.1yrs) wherein blood biomarkers (serum myostatin and IGF-1) were examined relative to age and appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM).Participants reported for a one-time assessment where two vials of blood were drawn, and body composition assessed using Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the model of best-fit to describe the relationship between the primary outcome variable (ASM) and the set of biomarkers (myostatin, IGF-1).RESULTS: Regression model results indicated 78% of the variance in ASM was accounted for when utilizing the four-predictor (age, sex, myostatin, IGF-1) regression model. However, neither biomarker significantly contributed to the model and only accounted for <1.0% (myostatin) and 1.4% (IGF-1) of the variance in ASM. CONCLUSION: Serum myostatin and IGF-1 concentrations were not significant predictors of ASM among middle-aged and older adults. Results of the present investigation add to meaningful conversation regarding the need for a preventative medicine approach to sarcopenia diagnosis with age. Yet, further evaluation of key relationships amid all sarcopenia-contributing variables, as they relate to blood biomarkers, serves as a starting point for examining muscle mass status with age.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: This project was funded by the Exercise Science Research Center, Provost’s Collaborate Research Grant, and SURF Grant monies.

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