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Article Title

EXPLORING A ROLE FOR CHROMATIN-REMODELING ENZYMES IN OXIDATIVE STRESS AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

Abstract

Binder K, Nessen E, Ollmann C, Sexauer A, Crosswhite P.

Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and oxidative stress is one contributing factor to dysfunction of the cardiovascular system. Chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) are enzymes that aid the regulation of DNA-histone binding to alter gene expression. Two CRCs, brahma (BRM) and brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1), are known to increase oxidative stress in cancer models but their role in the adult vasculature is poorly understood. PURPOSE: To measure the expression of oxidative stress markers after knockdown of BRG1/BRM in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). METHODS: Adult human SMCs were cultured and BRG1 and BRM were knocked down via an interfering RNA approach. Total RNA was isolated and quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the expression of several oxidative stress-related genes. RESULTS: Analysis of gene expression of oxidative stress-related markers including cellular-myleocytomatosis (c-MYC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and human SHC‐transforming protein 1 (SHC1) are ongoing and will be discussed. Based on literature, we expect that the levels of c-MYC and SOD will increase, while NOX4 and SCH1 will decrease. CONCLUSION: Our attempts to establish preliminary evidence linking CRC regulation of oxidative stress in adult human SMCs. This would be the first report of CRC-mediated oxidative stress in the adult vasculature and may open novel research opportunities for studying oxidative stress and CVD.

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