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Article Title

ACUTE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE: IMMEDIATE DEPRESSION AND SUBSEQUENT ELEVATION OF INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE

Abstract

A. Casayuran, S. Henry, R. Bulson, M. Czerwinski, L. Bassik

Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR

Intraocular pressure (IOP), the fluid pressure within the eye, is the main treatable risk factor for glaucoma. Although numerous research studies have shown IOP is decreased immediately following exercise, very few studies have addressed IOP alterations during recovery and return to baseline. PURPOSE: To investigate the acute effects of exercise intensity on IOP, including return to baseline. METHODS: Nineteen (9 males, 10 females; age = 20.26 ± 0.87 years; stature = 172.27 ± 13.51cm; mass = 72.23 ± 16.64 kg) with no history of ocular hypertension or glaucoma completed the study. Baseline measurements of heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and IOP were assessed. Participants completed Queen’s College Step Test to estimate VO2 max and prescribe treadmill speeds for 2.0 km at each intensity to keep work performed constant. Measurements continued immediately after exercise, and in 10 min intervals until IOP returned to within 10% of stable baseline value. Repeated measures ANOVA and post hoc tests compared IOP for baseline, moderate, and high intensity exercise. RESULTS: Immediately following high intensity exercise, IOP was reduced (12.27 ± 4.7 mmHg) compared to either baseline (16.25 ± 4.19 mmHg, pCONCLUSION:High intensity exercise elicited an immediate and transient decrease in IOP, in agreement with existing research. However, a subsequent elevation of IOP, or overshoot, also occurred during the recovery period of both exercise conditions. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to document the transient elevation of IOP that occurs during recovery from exercise.

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