Mahurin Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

Department

Psychological Sciences

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Sexual minorities have been shown to have increased risk of suicide in comparison to their heterosexual counterparts. This demographic has also been shown to have decreased levels of protective factors, which function as a measure to protect an individual from attempting suicide. The goal of the present study was to examine how individuals with sexual minority status differ from heterosexual individuals on suicide attempts and the protective factors of resilience, life satisfaction, and subjective happiness within a sample who all have NSSI history. A sample of 2,130 undergraduate students completed an online survey assessing nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide behaviors, along with the protective factors of resilience, life satisfaction, and subjective happiness. From this sample, 621 reported lifetime NSSI and were included for analyses. Within the sample of 621, 31% (n=210) identified as a sexual minority. Results partially confirmed the hypothesis that individuals who identified as a sexual minority with NSSI history would be more likely to report suicide attempts compared to their heterosexual counterparts with NSSI history, with greater likelihood of attempts reported for lifetime, but not past year. Results confirmed the hypothesis that individuals who identified as a sexual minority with NSSI history would report lower levels of resilience, life satisfaction, and subjective happiness when compared to their heterosexual counterparts with NSSI history. These results add to the current literature and further emphasize the disproportionate rates of suicide attempts and levels of protective factors within the sexual minority community who have used NSSI.

Advisor(s) or Committee Chair

Amy Brausch, Ph.D.

Disciplines

Other Psychiatry and Psychology | Psychology

Available for download on Friday, May 05, 2023

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