Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Privacy is a simple value shared by most people, but when that value is placed in the context of a right it, becomes more complex. The right to privacy has been recognized and expanded in the United States throughout history. This right is not absolute, however, and is in constant conflict with the state police powers. The Courts have become the mediator in this battle. While they have maintained a good balance between the two in the past, new threats to national security and technological advances prove to threaten that balance. This paper explores the battle between privacy rights and police powers in the past, present, and future, and the role that technology and war could play in the struggle.

Advisor(s) or Committee Chair

Sam McFarland

Disciplines

Social and Behavioral Sciences