Publication Date

5-2015

Degree Program

Department of Psychology

Degree Type

Master of Arts

Abstract

Individuals who are highly identified with a sport team have a strong psychological connection with the team (Wann et al., 2001). Sport team identification can be beneficial to communities and individuals. It provides entertainment, helps form group affiliation, and improves self-esteem. Because team identification is important to people, they notice environmental cues related to the team. Individuals are more likely to attend to a stimulus that is liked or one that is familiar. When an individual has accessible attitudes toward an object, he or she is more likely to attend to and notice the object (Roskos-Ewoldsen & Fazio, 1992). The current study examined the relationship between sport team identification and attention. Participants (n = 31) were presented with 64 displays of college team logos, which were shown in sequential order. While viewing the displays, participants’ eye movements were monitored by the SR Research Eyelink II, an eye-tracking recording system. The participants then completed a questionnaire designed to determine their level of team identification with an indicated team. Higher scores on the questionnaire indicated a higher level of identification. The first hypothesis under study states that highly identified UK fans detect the UK logo faster than the UT logo when each logo appears without the other, whereas low identified UK fans detect both the UK and UT logos equally quickly when each logo appears without the other. A mixed-model ANOVA was conducted to examine the impact of set type on total time to identify the target. The ANOVA yielded no main effects or interactions. The second hypothesis under study states that highly identified UK fans detect the UT logo more slowly when the UK logo is present than the low identified UK fans. A mixed-model ANOVA was conducted to examine how distractible the UK logo was when detecting the UT logo. The ANOVA yielded no main effects or interactions.

Disciplines

Community Psychology | Multicultural Psychology | Personality and Social Contexts | Social Psychology